A Battle Waged with Art and Faith

The Hill of Crosses, Kryziu Kalnas, in the city of Siauliai, Lithuania stands on a small hill, about 10 meters tall. The tradition of leaving crosses began after an uprising of the Polish and Lithuanians against the Russian tsar was squelched in 1831. Relatives of the dead rebels, with no bodies to bury, instead left crosses on this hill to commemorate their fallen.

Today there are about 200,000 crosses at the site, excluding carvings and shrines, made out of everything from wood to metal. During the Soviet occupation of Lithuania from 1944 to 1991, the Hill of Crosses became a symbol of defiance against the Communist regime.

Walking among numerous crosses, some decorated with devotion to loved ones, one can hear the rosaries rattle in the wind. This little hillock has long been a potent symbol of suffering, hope, devotion, and the undefeated faith of the Lithuanian people.

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2 Comments on “A Battle Waged with Art and Faith

  1. How very cool is THAT!? What an amazing sight! So much passion. Such deep devotion, faith and hope! Thanks for sharing.

    • I know, John, so cool. When a friend sent me the link this morning my jaw dropped. We’re all kept so well abreast of the horrible things in the world but we sometimes forget the beauty. “The light shines in the darkness. And the darkness has not overcome it.”

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